Annual Meeting Sessions and Events


A schedule of Annual Meeting sessions and events for each day is provided below. An Annual Meeting program outlining all sessions and events will be provided to attendees either in their hard copy Annual Meeting packet or within the Annual Meeting app. An advance copy of the program will be published on this page prior to the Annual Meeting.

Registration is required for the Annual Meeting.

Friday, November 19, 2021

10:00 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Executive Committee members only)

2:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(By invitation only; includes working dinner Friday, 6:00 p.m. and continues Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Considerable time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current NASM Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

2:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(By invitation only; includes working dinner Friday, 6:00 p.m. and continues Saturday, 9:00 a.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators who have been trained previously as evaluators and who have served as members of visitation teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the visit chair will be presented. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for administrators. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Orientation for New Board of Directors Members
(Board of Directors members only)

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Board of Directors Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This workshop is designated for representatives of institutions scheduled for NASM comprehensive accreditation reviews in the next three years, and as well for individuals who will have the responsibility of leading the process and/or writing the Self-Study. Those who have never led a comprehensive NASM accreditation review initiative or written an NASM Self-Study are especially encouraged to attend. Please note that this workshop will focus specifically on Format A. It will not consider in detail Formats B or C. However, since some sections of Self-Studies in all formats are interchangeable, those preparing Self-Studies in Formats B and C are welcome to attend. The primary focus on this first day of the workshop will be the NASM Handbook—its structure and content and its role in the evaluative process—with particular focus on the standards and their application. (Please note: Attendees should bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and NASM Procedures for Self-Study (Format A), and are encouraged to arrive with prepared questions in hand.)

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators Dinner Meeting
(By invitation only; continuation of Friday, 2:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.)

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators Dinner Meeting
(By invitation only; continuation of Friday, 2:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.)

Saturday, November 20, 2021

8:00 a.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Board of Directors Breakfast Seminar Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

8:15 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for administrators. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

8:15 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This workshop is designated for representatives of institutions scheduled for NASM comprehensive accreditation reviews in the next three years, and as well for individuals who will have the responsibility of leading the process and/or writing the Self-Study. Those who have never led a comprehensive NASM accreditation review initiative or written an NASM Self-Study are especially encouraged to attend. Please note that this workshop will focus specifically on Format A. It will not consider in detail Formats B or C. However, since some sections of Self-Studies in all formats are interchangeable, those preparing Self-Studies in Formats B and C are welcome to attend. The primary focus on this second day of the workshop will be the NASM Self-Study and the entire self-study process. (Please note: Attendees should bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and come prepared to ask questions.)

9:00 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop: Roundtable for Assistant Directors/Associate Deans
(Separate fee and advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

This roundtable is an interactive workshop for music administrators now serving as assistant directors/associate deans. Presentation topics include first-generation student engagement strategies; dealing with issues surrounding enrollment of international music students; and diversity as it relates to the makeup of the student body and faculty, and curricular offerings within the music unit. Attendees will also consider self-selected topics and case study materials dealing with issues pertinent to assistant directors/associate deans today.

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Continued from Friday afternoon)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Considerable time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current NASM Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Continued from Friday afternoon)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators who have been trained previously as evaluators and who have served as members of visitation teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the visit chair will be presented. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators of Community and Two-Year Colleges

This workshop will provide training to music administrators of community and two-year colleges interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process, and the roles and responsibilities of visiting evaluators will be discussed in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing NASM expectations with regard to Self-Study submissions and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current Handbook and its constituent parts will be provided. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review. Further specific attention will be devoted to guidelines that speak to the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators of Non-Degree Granting Institutions

This workshop will provide training to music administrators of non-degree-granting institutions interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process, and the roles and responsibilities of visiting evaluators will be discussed in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing NASM expectations with regard to Self-Study submissions and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current Handbook and its constituent parts will be provided. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review. Further specific attention will be devoted to guidelines that speak to the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Community and Two-Year Colleges: Preparing for Comprehensive Reviews
(Advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

Community and two-year colleges offering programs in music study represent a growing number of institutions within the NASM membership. This workshop, which will acknowledge and address many of the characteristics unique to these institutions, will provide information and guidance concerning the NASM comprehensive review process including a focus on self-study and the preparation of the Self-Study, and the onsite evaluative visit. A step-by-step walk-through of the nuts-and-bolts of the accreditation process will be provided. The benefits of NASM accredited institutional membership will be discussed. Participants are encouraged to pose questions during this session. Interested individuals representing community and two-year colleges at all stages of the self-study process are welcome.

1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Non-Degree-Granting Institutions: An Open Conversation
(Advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

This session will provide an opportunity for representatives from institutions holding accreditation with NASM and the Accrediting Commission for Community and Precollegiate Arts Schools (ACCPAS), NASM post-secondary degree-granting institutions offering precollegiate and community arts programs, NASM post-secondary degree-granting institutions offering post-secondary non-degree-granting programs, NASM post-secondary non-degree-granting institutions, and interested individuals an opportunity to come together to share and discuss topics related to community development, along with issues of common connection, interest, and concern.

Attendees will begin by considering ways in which community-based activities can be built into existing programs. Participants will consider how 1) current institutional assets and strengths can be leveraged to support activities, 2) to ascertain local community needs so that programming can align with these needs, 3) to develop action plans which are informed by desired outcomes, and 4) to adjudge the success of efforts. Attendees will then explore questions such as: In what ways can programs/institutions offering non-degree-granting study in music work together to align their efforts, resources, and activities in ways that best serve the needs of today’s students, local communities, and the field of music? In what ways can pre-collegiate and collegiate programs/institutions partner to create, expand, and open pipelines that enable pre-collegiate students to embark upon paths that will enable them to successfully pursue and enroll in music study at the collegiate level?

This session is open to administrators of all levels and from all types of programs/institutions offering opportunities for non-degree-granting music study including those considering accreditation with ACCPAS and/or NASM. Programs/institutions are welcome to send more than one administrative representative.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Orientation for Music Executives New to NASM

Attendees will be welcomed to NASM with a brief orientation and introductions to the members of the Board of Directors, including the Regional Chairs, and staff. The presentation of general overview information will be followed by small roundtable discussions led by Regional Chairs. Those who register in advance will be guided to review website information about NASM prior to the Annual Meeting.

5:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Briefing for Facilitators, Moderators, and Recorders

This briefing will present instructions, expectations, and helpful guidelines to Annual Meeting session facilitators, moderators, and recorders. All individuals who have agreed to serve in one of these capacities should plan to attend this briefing.

5:15 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Welcome Roundtable for Women Music Executives

Attendees will consider and discuss current and salient issues facing music administrators today based on an agenda developed by the session facilitators. Through conversation, the music executives in attendance will explore the challenges, opportunities, and realities posed by each. Time will also be devoted for attendees to meet, mingle, and mentor. This roundtable is open to all registrants.

6:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Reception for the Association

Sunday, November 21, 2021

6:45 a.m. – 6:15 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Regional Meetings: Elections and Discussion

These sessions are designed to enable the regions to welcome attendees, conduct their formal business, and begin discussion pertaining to issues of common interest and concern. Regions 1, 2, and 3 shall conduct regularly scheduled elections of all officers. Any open officer positions in other regions shall be filled by election during these meetings. Programmatic sessions developed by Regions 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 will be presented Monday, 1:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Regions 2, 4, 6, and 8 will be presented Monday, 3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Region 1
Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah
Fred Cohen, San Jose State University, Chair

Region 2
Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington
Dean Luethi, Washington State University, Chair

Region 3
Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming
Julia R. Gaines, University of Missouri, Columbia, Chair

Region 4
Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin
Alison Shaw, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Chair

Region 5
Indiana, Michigan, Ohio
Susan D. Van Vorst, Baldwin Wallace University, Chair

Region 6
Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia
David Davies, Nazareth College, Vice Chair

Region 7
Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Virginia
Isiah R. McGee, Claflin University, Chair

Region 8
Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee
Julia Mortyakova, Mississippi University for Women, Chair

Region 9
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas
Gary T. Wurtz, Stephen F. Austin State University, Vice Chair

8:45 a.m. – 10:35 a.m.

First General Session: Plenary Business Meeting and Keynote Address

Call to Order and Welcome
Dan Dressen, NASM President

Greetings from the European Association of Conservatoires
Eirik Birkeland, AEC President

Reports of the Commissions
Commission on Community College Accreditation
Commission on Accreditation

Introduction of Newly Accredited Member Institutions

Report of the Treasurer

Report of the Committee on Ethics

Announcements

Consideration of Proposed Handbook Amendments

Report of the Nominating Committee

Keynote Address to the Association

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Reception for Spouses and Guests

This reception provides an opportunity for spouses and guests of Annual Meeting attendees to meet and engage in fellowship. Light refreshments will be served.

10:45 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Revisiting Assumptions; Exploring Possibilities

The need for music administrators to study, understand, and manage present-day realities, and to consider, anticipate, and react to unknowns in the higher education landscape have become important aspects of the work of the music unit and critical considerations if the future of music study in higher education is to be maintained, if not ensured. The health crisis  of the past 18 months and escalating concerns as they pertain to current social issues have made this need abundantly clear.

The challenges faced, due to their impacts on the engagement of our students, the productivity of our faculties, the availability and allocation of resources, the success of the delivery the curriculum, and the essence of the nature of our art form have forced us to revisit and review many aspects of our programs, long thought to be comfortably ensconced in our well-established and existing cultures. But these challenges have also resulted in opportunities, made possible by the permissions inherent in the challenges. Although unwelcome in their form, current realities have presented to us opportunities to consider current approaches, broaden the depth and breadth of our conversations, welcome ideas and thoughts, and develop not only a renewed awareness, but a deeper understanding of conditions and their nature which must be kept in the forefront of and guide our decision-making processes.

Four sessions, each centered on a different issue related to current assumptions and possibilities within music training and administration, will be offered. Each session will include a presentation followed by an opportunity for attendees to pose questions and consider ideas. Subsequent to each presentation, attendees will assemble in small breakout groups for the purpose of exploring issues in further detail and depth. Please note that each of the four morning sessions will be repeated from 2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m., providing the opportunity for attendees to attend two of the four sessions.

10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Broadening Perspectives: A Consideration of Various Musics and the Role They Play in the Education and Training of Music Students

Inspired, creative teaching may rightly lead to new content, methodologies, and results, all of which actively broaden the range of studies and specializations within the field of music. What was once considered outside of traditional musical training is now widely offered and available to students. With an increase in the types of musics that students may be familiar with or interested in, music administrators may find themselves needing to broaden their views, listen to students, and explore aspects of music-making that can offer uncharted educational territories. Noting the growth and expansion of new musics, institutions must consider which traditional aspects of the curriculum must stay, which should be adapted, and which can be let go. What new types of music-making are we likely to find in the field, and possibly, therefore, in the curriculum? How do we define music-making, considering vast technological advances? What voices are currently making the musics of tomorrow? How are these musics being made? What expertise is needed to make this music, to study it, to teach it? What are the differences between and among these new expertises, as compared to more traditional approaches? Do new styles of music challenge existing music-making norms and traditions? If so, how, and should/must the two co-exist in institutions of higher learning? What impact will these changes have on student admission, engagement, and success within the field? Through a presentation and facilitated discussion, attendees will discuss these issues, along with relevant items of shared interest—items that may assist music administrators to not only observe but cultivate trends in the musical and higher education landscapes. Time for questions and facilitated discussion will be provided.

10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Access: The Unintended Consequences of Systems and Mechanisms

Entities of all shapes and sizes rely on systems and mechanisms to ensure their smooth operation. Tasks are regularized, controls are put in place, results can be counted quickly and easily; implementation and use provides stability, consistency, and a level of assured organization. Although structured systems and mechanisms have their benefits, they may also have their limits in certain circumstances. Noting the adage that suggests that, not everything that counts can be counted, the implementation and use of systems and mechanisms must be reviewed from several if not many perspectives. In cases when the human condition prevails (i.e., that which directly affects individuals), such considerations are critical. In this session, attendees will explore the various aspects of the operation of music units that often are served by systems and mechanisms, such as those used to admit students, search for and hire faculty, retain faculty, control resource allocations, direct spending, assign fees, and the like. Consideration will also be given to systems and mechanisms beyond the control of the academy, such as those that can impede a student’s application progress and, therefore, potential acceptance. Presenters will consider and explore inherent and systemic barriers that may be both a necessity and an impediment in the study of music in institutions of higher learning. Time for questions and facilitated discussion will be provided.

10:45 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

The Arts Ecosystem: What Awaits Our Students Beyond the Gates of the Academy?

Much of an institution’s educational experience centers on a student’s journey from learner, to expert, to maker of, and contributor to, the artform beyond the academy. While it is not uncommon for graduates to pursue work as performers, freelance musicians, music educators, private teachers, community collaborators, employees of arts organizations, and other professional work, music administrators may not be fully aware at all times of the opportunities that exist for students outside of the academy’s walls. Knowledge of the ever-changing post-academy landscape is invaluable when held by administrators and faculties with responsibilities for curricular planning and formulation. As well, such knowledge can provide a helpful backdrop as institutions consider innovative options and creative possibilities. It may also assist institutions to develop their approaches as they may pertain to the formulation of educational experiences and the mentoring of students who are nearing the completion of their degree programs. What foundational knowledge must all students possess before leaving the academy to pursue work in the field of music and/or the arts ecosystem? Are students gaining the expertise needed to advance the artform, and as well, to address the needs of society? If not, what is missing and how can it be provided? When framing this issue in terms of a student’s post-academy success, is breadth more important than depth when it comes to experience? Does depth take precedence at a certain stage in the development of a student’s subject-matter expertise, and if so, how might such precedences impact a student’s preparation for future endeavors? What does the arts economy look like now, what is it expected to look like in the future? How do we prepare our students for what we know to exist, and for what we cannot yet imagine? How can we prepare our students for their many futures? Will the discipline or the ecosystem drive the future of our artform? In what ways? Time for questions and facilitated discussion will be provided.

10:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Remote Learning: Does it Enhance Our Ability to Educate Students?

The pandemic has resulted in the need for institutions to design, implement, and make use of various delivery systems that enable instructors and administrators to better reach and engage students enrolled in music programs. Certain delivery methods may have been found to be useful, effective, and successful, while others may be tedious, cumbersome, or unsustainable. What have we learned during the last 18 months?  What is necessary?  What is negotiable?  What is comfortable, but no longer effective?  What no longer works? How might music units craft new practices and policies that are informed by the lessons learned? Do the same pedagogies work in both in-person and online settings? Must all students be technologically proficient to succeed? How should realities around equity and access inform conversations around delivery methods? Have pedagogical innovations resulted from remote learning? If so, what are they? Might new approaches change the form and nature of student experiences (i.e., applied lessons, ensemble participation, capstone experiences)? What effect might various systems have on pedagogy, research, scholarship, and performance, as they relate to aspects of faculty development and advancement? Does the use of remote learning enhance the effectiveness, relevance, and ability of the curriculum to prepare students for the arts ecosystem they will enter after they depart the academy? Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Revisiting Assumptions; Exploring Possibilities (Repeated Sessions)

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

 

Broadening Perspectives: A Consideration of Various Musics and the Role They Play in the Education and Training of Music Students
(See description above.)

 

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

 

Access: The Unintended Consequences of Systems and Mechanisms
(See description above.)

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

 

The Arts Ecosystem: What Awaits Our Students Beyond the Gates of the Academy?
(See description above.)

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Remote Learning: Does it Enhance Our Ability to Educate Students?
(See description above.)

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Briefing: Federal Issues

Under the law, the federal government does not control higher education. However, the federal government does play a major role in developing conditions for the work of higher education, primarily through laws and regulations defining conditions for institutional participation in grant and student loan programs, and tax policies that influence economic conditions affecting education and the arts. Following a brief introduction to the higher education and policy landscapes, this session will address the current political climate; various pressures on institutions; and current and prospective federal policies, laws, and regulations affecting higher education and the arts. This briefing will take a non-partisan policy analysis approach, looking at the ramifications and costs of various options and probabilities. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

HEADS Part I: Completing and Submitting the HEADS Data Survey

This session will provide an in-depth review of procedures for online submission of the HEADS Data Survey for degree-granting institutions. A section-by-section overview of the Survey will explain in detail the Survey submission process, types of data collected, and suggested collection mechanisms. Questions will be taken throughout the presentation. (Please note: “HEADS Part I” will not be repeated. “HEADS Part II: Using Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projections” will be offered Monday, 4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.)

4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Briefing for NASM Evaluators

This annual briefing is offered by invitation for individuals currently trained and serving as NASM visiting evaluators. It provides an opportunity for evaluators to refresh their knowledge of NASM procedures, protocols, and standards, with particular focus on the Procedures and the Handbook. Helpful reminders regarding the format, preparation, and required content of Visitors’ Reports will be provided. The potential impact of the activities of external constituencies, such as the federal government, states, and other review bodies, which may affect the accreditation process, will be discussed. Documentation required of institutions and evaluators will be highlighted, as well as sources and uses of helpful and informative publications aimed to assist institutions in the preparation of Self-Studies and evaluators in the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

 

Communicating with the Commissions: Creating Effective Written Accreditation Materials

From time to time, member and potential member institutions of NASM must submit materials that will be reviewed by either the Commission on Accreditation or the Commission on Community College Accreditation, the Association’s accreditation decision-making bodies. These Commissions are responsible for ascertaining an institution’s current and projected compliance with applicable standards. This includes consideration of an institution’s short-term solutions and long-term plans. This session will offer an overview of the Commissions’ roles within the accreditation review process and will provide some helpful hints and tips for creating, writing, and submitting materials to the Commissions. Documents to be discussed include the Self-Study, the institution’s Optional Response to the Visitors’ Report, Responses, Progress Reports, applications for Plan Approval and Final Approval for Listing. The mandatory and effective use of the NASM Handbook in preparing submissions will be discussed.

4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Dialogue Sessions

NASM hosts several dialogue sessions that provide opportunities for attendees to meet with Commission Chairs and members of the Committee on Ethics. These sessions are intended to offer opportunities for open and informative discussion. Although the Commission Chairs and Committee on Ethics members will be unable to comment on accreditation actions or issues specific to a particular institution, they will address questions about accreditation policy and procedures, and accept suggestions with regard to NASM standards and accreditation procedures.

(Dialogue sessions with the Chair of the Commission on Accreditation and the Chair of the Commission on Community College Accreditation will be repeated Monday, 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. The dialogue session with the Committee on Ethics will not be repeated.)

Commission on Accreditation                                                                         

Commission on Community College Accreditation                                

Committee on Ethics

5:45 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.

Informal Gathering of New Music Executives

Individuals attending the NASM Annual Meeting for the first time, and those in the early years of their administrative careers, are encouraged to join other new executives for an informal gathering. This gathering provides an opportunity to meet, greet, cultivate valuable professional relationships and to initiate conversations with other new music executives.

6:15 p.m. -7:30 p.m.

Reception for the Association

Monday, November 22, 2021

7:00 a.m. – 6:15 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:15 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Coffee and Rolls for the Association

7:45 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Briefing: Local Problem-Solving with NASM Resources

Although NASM’s primary focus is accreditation, it also generates a wealth of resources applicable to non-accreditation-related issues. This session will provide an introduction to some of NASM’s most frequently cited papers and advisory statements on topics including justification, curricular review, promotion and tenure, musician health, and others. A brief look at the NASM website, including the location of various online resources, will be included. Music executives new to NASM, or those unfamiliar with its online resources and publications, are encouraged to attend.

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Dialogue Sessions
(Repeat of Sunday, 4:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.)

Commission on Accreditation

Commission on Community College Accreditation

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Second General Session

Report of the Executive Director
Election of Officers
Report of the President

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

A Brewing Problem: The Effects the Pandemic Have Had and Will Have on the Mental Health and Personal Well-Being of Students, Faculty, Staff, and Administrators—An Exploration of What May Lie Ahead

The effects the pandemic have had and will continue to have on the personal well-being of our music students, faculty and staff members, and administrators is a growing concern, if not a ticking time bomb within the higher education community today. Although the pandemic itself is the predominant instigator of a general malaise, many other factors are in play, such as prohibitions which prevent engagement and interaction among friends and family; uncertainty as it pertains to the future (i.e., employment, financial security, livelihood, etc.); the tone and tenor of our nation’s discourse; and unfolding social issues and associated unrest. The true nature of the breadth and depth of any potential impact is unknown. However, the signs are no doubt a bellwether of what may lie ahead, and how such pressures will affect those involved in the work of the music unit.

It is safe to say that students enrolled in collegiate programs of study in music already face an exponential number of personal challenges, including but not limited to: stressors related to auditions and performances; a blurring of the boundary between the personal and the professional; an inability to develop the confidence needed to weather challenges—each of which seems to arrive more swiftly than the last. Faculty and staff members as well as administrators are also grappling with a wide range of challenges and pressures. Since the onset of the pandemic, faculty members have faced the need to design and redesign various forms of content delivery all the while maintaining attention to their own creative practice, pedagogy, scholarship, and research. Faculty responsibilities, and therefore loads, have expanded exponentially in many cases. Staff members have been tasked with creating systems which address today’s realities. It is often the case that subsequent to implementation of measures in response, the landscape changes, and therefore yesterday’s assumptions must be revisited and reworked, as they are no longer relevant. The responsibilities of music administrators have burgeoned, now extending well beyond those associated with the unit’s operational activities and curricular offerings. The leadership provided by the music administrator may be the deciding factor in the future of the music unit and its ability to continue to educate music students, if not in its ability to exist. The pressures placed on and faced by the music executive have rarely been so acute.

Given what is now faced by students, faculty and staff, and administrators, there is no doubt that institutions will be called upon to step forward to ascertain not only the needs of these individuals but as well, to serve the demand created by the need. There is no question that institution-wide initiatives focusing on the development of specific approaches intended to assist in the maintenance and care of the mental health of relevant constituencies are of vital importance, having a substantial impact on the health and well-being of all involved. Today’s presenter will frame the issue, discuss current realities, explore with attendees what is anticipated, and assist attendees to consider and develop action plans which may serve to proactively support and assist those in need of assistance.  Time for discussion will be provided.

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Establishing Boundaries: Addressing Power Dynamics and Inculcated Cultures

There are inherent realities in an academic setting that establish power structures based on conditions such as social hierarchies, subject-matter expertise, and rank. It is possible for these systems to yield positive results that benefit both the institution and the individuals who work within it, encourage scholarship, and build a collegial and healthy competitiveness, which may serve to benefit those involved and enhance the field of music. However, there are inherent risks that, if left unspoken and unaddressed, will create atmospheres which enable individuals to misuse or worse, abuse the power inherent or perceived to be inherent in their positions. Once established, such atmospheres develop into cultures that are apt to cause professional relationships to deteriorate, and equitable power ratios and the boundaries that have been mutually constructed and negotiated to change. Left unchecked and unmanaged, an imbalance may be created which can negatively affect the education and training of students, the morale and effectiveness of all involved, and consume the attention of the music administrator, as such cultures, once established, are often difficult to walk back and unravel. Therefore, it behooves the music administrator to work to establish protocols which inform guidelines and foster cultures which clearly outline expectations and ramifications should boundaries be challenged or disregarded.

Misconduct is not uncommon in higher education. There is no doubt that faculty members may have influence over their students’ careers; administrators may hold the power to promote/demote their colleagues; and certain students may exercise control over their peers in myriad ways. As the line between productive and non-productive relationships can be thin, and the opportunity to create negative cultures remains prevalent, it is imperative that all individuals within the music unit work together proactively to create and maintain healthy and productive professional relationships.

Attendees will consider the following: How do institutions create formidable structures that diminish or eliminate the opportunity for sexual misconduct, harassment, or other misuses of power? Are there particular structures that are riper for abuse than others? What must music administrators do to create a culture of respect—one that allows work to continue without unnecessary pressures from above? Who is responsible for recognizing certain behaviors, for reporting these behaviors, and for investigating them? How do administrators best communicate with students, faculty, and fellow administrators these important steps? How can all individuals entrusted with educating students encourage trust in newly crafted and/or revamped processes for reporting or investigating possible infractions? How does one know when trust in a given system is lost, and how can this trust be regained?

This session will offer to attendees examples of healthy as well as dysfunctional power structures within institutions, in addition to a discussion of ways to identify power structures, dismantle and/or revise current structures, and build environments that discourage the formation of undesirable dynamics. Time for questions will be provided.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

A Brewing Problem: The Effects the Pandemic Have Had and Will Have on the Mental Health and Personal Well-Being of Students, Faculty, Staff, and Administrators—An Exploration of What May Lie Ahead (Repeated Session)
(See description above.)

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Establishing Boundaries: Addressing Power Dynamics and Inculcated Cultures (Repeated Session)
(See description above.)

12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Executive Committee members only)

1:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Programs Sponsored by Regions (Regions 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9)

3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Programs Sponsored by Regions (Regions 2, 4, 6, and 8)

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

The National Standards and Their Application: Designing and Implementing Undergraduate Curricular Programs

From time to time, and for a variety of reasons, music units may decide to undertake the complex task of designing and implementing new undergraduate degree programs. There are many issues that must be considered, such as the intended purpose of the degree, the degree’s title, whether the content required aligns with the title assigned, the availability of coursework necessary to develop desired competencies. As well, resources must be considered, and consensus must be built. Only with these understandings in hand can an institution begin to plan the architecture of a curricular program.

During this session, attendees will explore the issues noted above, and as well, the standards and guidelines located in the NASM Handbook, and their application. The natures of and differences between liberal arts and professional baccalaureate degrees will be addressed, as will the fundamental functions of majors, minors, and areas of emphasis. Issues that arise regarding title and content consistency will be discussed. Attendees will have an opportunity to pose questions and consider explore possibilities.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

HEADS Part II: Using Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projections

The institutional research data gathered and compiled by the Higher Education Arts Data Services project constitute a unique and valuable resource for music executives at degree-granting institutions. This session will highlight many of the ways the data can be used to assist, support, and possibly guide local planning, conversations, and decision-making. The session will offer a detailed overview of statistics contained in the HEADS Data Summaries (the aggregate reports compiled annually from HEADS Data Surveys), and the use of HEADS Data Summaries and Special Reports for comparison among specific peer institutions. In addition, attendees will also learn how to create longitudinal reports, and consider together how such reports can be used to capture, analyze, and present available data in ways which may convincingly support music unit initiatives.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Historically Black Institutions

This session is designed to provide a forum where ideas and concerns of particular relevance to historically Black institutions may be discussed. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Roundtable for Small Music Units

Music executives from small music units, typically with fewer than 50 majors, will have the opportunity to discuss topics of specific relevance or concern, and to pose questions to colleagues facing similar challenges and opportunities. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Issues in Sacred Music/Worship Studies

This open forum will provide an opportunity to discuss topics of interest and importance to units offering sacred music/worship studies. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Roundtable for Community and Two-Year Colleges

This interactive session will provide an opportunity to brainstorm and discuss ideas and best practices of particular relevance to community and two-year colleges. Participants will be encouraged to share information from their own institutions, followed by a time for reflection and discussion. Attendance is open to all interested individuals.

7:15 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Executive Committee Dinner Meeting
(Executive Committee members only)

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

7:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Specific Procedures for NASM Evaluation

This session will provide information and guidance concerning the self-study and visitation processes for individuals whose institutions are (1) scheduled to be visited in the next two years, (2) planning to begin the NASM evaluation process, (3) formally engaged in the process, or (4) contemplating the submission of original applications for accreditation. A step-by-step walk-through of the nuts-and-bolts of the accreditation process will be provided, including confirmation of timelines and deadlines, and information regarding accreditation procedures, Self-Study formats, on-site reviews, the Visitors’ Report, the Optional Response, and Commission action. All three Self-Study formats (A, B, and C) will be discussed. All interested individuals are welcome. (Please note: Attendees should bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and NASM Procedures for Self-Study (Format A, B, or C), and are encouraged to arrive with prepared questions in hand.)

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Board of Directors Breakfast Seminar Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

11:30 a.m.

Adjournment

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