Annual Meeting Sessions and Events


A schedule of Annual Meeting sessions and events for each day is provided below. A printed program of all sessions and events will be provided to attendees in their registration packets, which will be provided on-site. An advance copy of the program will be published on this page prior to the Annual Meeting.

Registration is required for the Annual Meeting.

Friday, November 22, 2019

10:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Executive Committee members only)

2:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Continued on Saturday at 9:00 a.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Considerable time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current NASM Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation. (Please note: This workshop is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

2:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Continued on Saturday at 9:00 a.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators who have previously been trained as evaluators and who have served as members of visitation teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the visit chair will be presented. (Please note: This workshop is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

 

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for administrators. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Orientation for New Board Members
(Board of Directors members only)

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Board of Directors Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

This workshop is especially for institutions scheduled for NASM accreditation reviews in the next three years, and for individuals who will have the responsibility of leading the process and/or writing the Self-Study. Those who have never led or written an NASM Self-Study are especially encouraged to attend. Please note that this workshop will focus specifically on Format A. It will not consider in detail Formats B or C. However, since some sections of Self-Studies in all formats are interchangeable, those preparing Self-Studies in Formats B and C are welcome. The primary focus on this first day of the workshop will be the NASM Handbook. (Please note: Attendees should bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and come prepared to ask questions.)

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators Dinner Meeting
(By invitation only)

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators Dinner Meeting
(By invitation only)

Saturday, November 23, 2019

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Board of Directors Breakfast Seminar Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

8:15 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for administrators. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

8:15 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

This workshop is especially for institutions scheduled for NASM accreditation reviews in the next three years, and for individuals who will have the responsibility of leading the process and/or writing the Self-Study. Those who have never led or written an NASM Self-Study are especially encouraged to attend. Please note that this workshop will focus specifically on Format A. It will not consider in detail Formats B or C. However, since some sections of Self-Studies in all formats are interchangeable, those preparing Self-Studies in Formats B and C are welcome. The primary focus on this second day of the workshop will be the NASM Self-Study and the entire self-study process. (Please note: Attendees should bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and come prepared to ask questions.)

9:00 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop: Roundtable for Assistant Directors/Associate Deans
(Separate fee and advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

The roundtable will include both short presentations and discussions related to various futures issues affecting the work of music administrators. Topics will include recruitment and the development of new programs, the role of middle management during times of change, and nurturing and mentoring administrators. Hypothetical case studies will be offered and discussed.

9:00 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop: Building and Renovating Future-Ready Facilities
(Separate fee and advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

Ensuring access to and use of facilities which not only support adequately an institution’s current curricular offerings and activities in music but provide to an institution the latitude to advance its planned initiatives as well as to prepare for and address future unknowns, are critical components of an institution’s ability to deliver its educational programs and experiences to music students and to engage with the community effectively. Whether designing new or renovating existing spaces, these considerations, as well as those related to health and safety, multi-functionality of space, technology and associated advancements such as distance delivery and cyber collaboration, and audience interaction and engagement, must be considered and factored appropriately into decision-making processes. A panel of experts will provide an overview of a variety of basic architectural and acoustical topics related to the planning, designing, and construction of new facilities, as well as the renovation of existing facilities.

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Continued from Friday afternoon)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Considerable time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current NASM Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation. (Please note: This workshop is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Continued from Friday afternoon)

This annual workshop will provide training to music administrators who have previously been trained as evaluators and who have served as members of visitation teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the visit chair will be presented. (Please note: This workshop is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators of Community and Two-Year Colleges

This workshop will provide training to music administrators of community and two-year colleges interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process, and the roles and responsibilities of visiting evaluators will be discussed in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing NASM expectations with regard to Self-Study submissions and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current Handbook and its constituent parts will be provided. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review. Further specific attention will be devoted to guidelines that speak to the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: This workshop is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators of Non-Degree Granting Institutions

This workshop will provide training to music administrators of non-degree-granting institutions interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASM. Fundamentals of the accreditation process, and the roles and responsibilities of visiting evaluators will be discussed in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing NASM expectations with regard to Self-Study submissions and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the current Handbook and its constituent parts will be provided. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review. Further specific attention will be devoted to guidelines that speak to the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: This session is by invitation only. Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

 

1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Community and Two-Year Colleges: The Self-Study Process
(Advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

Community and two-year colleges offering programs in music study represent a growing number of institutions within the NASM membership. This workshop, which will acknowledge and address many of the characteristics unique to these institutions, will provide information and guidance concerning the NASM self-study and visitation processes. A step-by-step walk-through of the nuts-and-bolts of the accreditation process will be provided. The benefits of NASM accredited institutional membership will be discussed. Participants are encouraged to pose questions during this session. Interested individuals representing community and two-year colleges at all stages of the self-study process are welcome.

1:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Non-Degree-Granting Institutions: An Open Conversation
(Advance registration required; click here for full workshop description)

This session will provide an opportunity for representatives from institutions holding accreditation with NASM and the Accrediting Commission for Community and Precollegiate Arts Schools (ACCPAS), NASM post-secondary degree-granting institutions offering precollegiate and community arts programs, NASM post-secondary degree-granting institutions offering post-secondary non-degree-granting programs, and NASM post-secondary non-degree-granting institutions an opportunity to come together to share and discuss issues of common connection, interest, and concern. In addition to the discussion topics attendees may wish to propose for consideration during the session, the following questions will be explored: In what ways can programs/institutions offering non-degree-granting study in music work together to align their efforts, resources, and activities in ways that best serve the needs of today’s students, local communities, and the field of music? In what ways can pre-collegiate and collegiate programs/institutions partner to create, expand, and open pipelines that enable pre-collegiate students to embark upon paths that will enable them to successfully pursue and enroll in music study at the collegiate level?

This session is open to administrators of all levels and from all types of programs/institutions offering opportunities for non-degree-granting music study including those considering accreditation with ACCPAS and/or NASM. Programs/institutions are welcome to send more than one administrative representative.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Orientation for Music Executives New to NASM

Attendees will be welcomed to NASM with a brief orientation and introductions to Board members, Regional Chairs, and staff. The presentation of general overview information will be followed by small roundtable discussions led by Regional Chairs. Those who register in advance will be guided to review website information about NASM prior to the Annual Meeting.

5:15 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Welcome Roundtable for Women Music Executives

Attendees will enumerate some of the most salient current issues facing music administrators today. Guided by the facilitator, the music executives in attendance will consider together and discuss the challenges, opportunities, and realities posed by each.

6:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Reception for the Association

(back to top)

Sunday, November 24, 2019

6:45 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

7:30 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.

Briefing for Moderators and Recorders

All individuals serving as moderators or recorders for the Sunday afternoon roundtables should plan to attend this informative briefing. A member of the NASM Executive Committee and staff will offer guidance, advice, and expectations.

8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Regional Meetings: Elections and Discussion

These sessions are designed to enable the regions to welcome attendees, conduct their formal business, and begin discussion pertaining to issues of common interest and concern. Regions 7, 8, and 9 shall conduct regularly scheduled elections of all officers. Any open officer positions in other regions shall be filled by election during these meetings. Programmatic sessions developed by Regions 2, 4, 6, and 8 will be presented Monday, 1:45 p.m.–3:00 p.m.; Regions 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 will be presented Monday, 3:15 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Region 1
Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah
Fred Cohen, San Jose State University, Chair

Region 2
Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington
Keith Kothman, Montana State University, Chair

Region 3
Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming
Julia Gaines, University of Missouri, Columbia, Chair

Region 4
Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin
Mark Smith, Chicago State University, Chair

Region 5
Indiana, Michigan, Ohio
Kathleen Hacker, University of Indianapolis, Chair

Region 6
Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia
Armenio Suzano, Jr., Houghton College, Chair

Region 7
Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Virginia
John P. Henry, Jr., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Chair

Region 8
Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee
Caterina Bristol, Alabama State University, Chair

Region 9
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas
David E. Scott, Texas A&M University–Commerce, Chair

9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

First General Session: Plenary Business Meeting

Call to Order and Welcome
Dan Dressen, NASM President

Greetings from the European Association of Conservatoires
Eirik Birkeland, AEC President

Reports of the Commissions
Commission on Community College Accreditation
Commission on Accreditation

Introduction of Newly Accredited Member Institutions

Report of the Treasurer

Report of the Committee on Ethics

Consideration of Proposed Handbook Amendments

Report of the Nominating Committee

Report of the President

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Reception for Spouses and Guests

This reception provides an opportunity for spouses and guests of Annual Meeting attendees to meet and engage in fellowship. Light refreshments will be served.

10:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Enrollment Planning: Considering Demographics, Devising Strategies, Discussing Solutions

The need to proactively consider, study, monitor, and react to events and realities that will directly impact the number of students interested in entering the academy and in music study has become an important part of the music executive’s daily regimen. In this three-part session, attendees will receive a briefing which outlines trends and projections, and their anticipated impact on post-secondary institutions; consider approaches and strategies that can not only assist music administrators to stem the coming tide but help them to manage aspects of the tide in ways that can result in positive outcomes for music programs; and devise together creative solutions that will ensure the health and vitality of music study and the institutions in which music study resides.

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Enrollment Planning: Considering Demographics

Given the decline in the birthrate attributed to the effects of the 2008 financial crisis, it is predicted that the number of students entering the academy will drop precipitously between 2025 and 2029. The decline is expected to continue for several years thereafter, although it is not expected to be as dramatic. Such predictions speak resoundingly to the need for institutions to review their long-range plans and planning initiatives. In doing so, prudence would suggest that the research available be studied carefully and our consideration be informed by questions such as: What trends are being observed? What impact will these trends have on the academy—specifically on large, small, public, private, free-standing music, community and two-year institutions? Will the impact differ among community and two-year, baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degree-granting institutions? Will the drop be equally distributed among all institutions? Will it affect some regions of the country more than others? What impact will these trends have on an institution’s ability to find, hire, and retain faculty? What is the anticipated impact on teaching, on learning? What might be the impact on curricular offerings—will institutions need to discontinue, add, modify curricular programs? How will the landscape change? What are music programs and institutions likely to experience in the next year, five years, ten years? Attendees will give considerable thought to these questions, as their answers will become critical components in an institution’s decision-making processes.

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Enrollment Planning: Devising Strategies

Noting the nature and speed of change today and understanding that change is a constant over which music administrators have no guaranteed control, and willingly accepting the assured turmoil change will bring on a regular if not daily basis, when faced with change, music executives have two choices—acquiesce, giving way to change and allowing it to become the agent of action or lack thereof, or engage, using the opportunities change presents to creatively work problems that will arise and devise strategies to address them. If our goal is to ensure the long-term health and well-being of collegiate music study, then it is important to remember that our collective efforts supportive of the field are as important as our individual efforts supportive of local initiatives. A problem of the magnitude which music in higher education will face over the next decade will require engaged buy-in and collective effort.

In this session, attendees will explore areas over which they may have some control, and that given thoughtful attention, can directly impact their endeavors to maintain, if not bolster, enrollments. These areas include, but are not limited to: establishing recruitment pipelines; developing marketing strategies; establishing local advocacy campaigns; strategically using merit-based aid; reaching non-traditional students; enhancing campus visit and audition day experiences; reviewing curricular offerings in terms of degree levels, majors, area of emphasis, and minors; reviewing the transferability of coursework; managing resources; optimizing funding sources; optimizing learning environments and performance opportunities; providing on-campus support mechanisms; leveraging technology to advance both learning opportunities and avenues of communication; creating student success and retention initiatives; developing outreach initiatives; forging connections with high schools and community music groups; engaging alumni; and the like. Consideration will be given to the effective use of research results to inform conversations, considerations, and decision-making. Successes that offer examples of good practices, possible ideas, and helpful tools will be provided.

2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Enrollment Planning: Discussing Possible Solutions

Having considered the changing demographics anticipated and strategies that can be employed to address future enrollment declines, participants in each breakout group are asked to explore in depth and detail initiatives that could be employed to address what may await ahead. Rather than restate the issues, participants are asked to creatively and innovatively design and articulate viable solutions.

Breakout groups will be divided by size and type of institution.

10:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Defining Expectations for and Developing Subject Matter Expertise in Undergraduate Discipline-Specific Areas

Over time, the field of music has developed sophisticated and well-established approaches to and indicators of achievement and quality. These guide our daily work and serve as the foundation upon which expectations related to the acquisition of subject matter knowledge and skills rest. Although these approaches are tried and true, and although students demonstrate deep and abiding understandings and abilities, it is, from time-to-time, of worthy and appropriate purpose to revisit our expectations, particularly given changes and advancements that are taking place in the field of music and its sub-disciplines.

Ten topic areas will be discussed: Music Education, Music History, Music Therapy, Performance/Ensemble (Solo Performance, Small Ensembles, and Large Ensembles), Composition, Music Business/Music Industry/Commercial Music, and Sacred Music. Sessions pertaining to Music Education, Music Theory, Performance/Ensemble, and Composition will be repeated. Attendees will have the opportunity to choose three from among the ten. Facilitators will open and guide discussion, challenging participants to consider each sub-discipline anew—to not only reaffirm and recommit to aspects that are vital to the education and training of students, but as well, to consider aspects that will become necessary and critical components of the undergraduate experience in each sub-discipline.

With regard to each sub-discipline, attendees are asked to consider issues of common interest as well as the following: What body of knowledge must students acquire? What skills? Why, and what purpose(s) will they serve? How should this knowledge and these skills be developed/through what means? How will technology and technological advancements change approaches to teaching and learning? Should/must they? Are only new curricular initiatives innovative? Can a time-honored traditional program be innovative? In what ways? What are the earmarks of an innovative program?

At the conclusion of each session, attendees may wish to consider whether expectations held which relate to currently offered curricular programs have changed in any way, and if so, logical next steps. Those wishing to continue their considerations in this regard may wish to consult the document entitled, Achievement and Quality: Higher Education in the Arts found on the NASM website.

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Defining Expectations for and Developing Subject Matter Expertise in Undergraduate Discipline-Specific Areas

Music Education
Music History
Music Theory
Music Therapy

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Defining Expectations for and Developing Subject Matter Expertise in Undergraduate Discipline-Specific Areas

Composition
Music Business/Music Industry/Commercial Music
Performance/Ensembles (Solo Performance, Small Ensembles, Large Ensembles)
Sacred Music

2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Defining Expectations for and Developing Subject Matter Expertise in Undergraduate Discipline-Specific Areas

Composition
Music Education
Performance/Ensembles (Solo Performance, Small Ensembles, Large Ensembles)
Music Theory

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Communicating with the Commissions: Creating Effective Written Accreditation Materials

From time to time, member and potential member institutions of NASM must submit materials that will be reviewed by either the Commission on Accreditation or the Commission on Community College Accreditation, the Association’s accreditation decision-making bodies. These Commissions are responsible for ascertaining an institution’s current and projected compliance with applicable standards. This includes consideration of an institution’s short-term solutions and long-term plans. This session will offer an overview of the Commissions’ roles within the accreditation review process and will provide some helpful hints and tips for creating, writing, and submitting materials to the Commissions. Documents to be discussed include the Self-Study, the institution’s Optional Response to the Visitors’ Report, Responses, Progress Reports, applications for Plan Approval and Final Approval for Listing. The mandatory and effective use of the NASM Handbook in preparing submissions will be discussed.

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

HEADS Part I: Completing and Submitting the HEADS Data Survey

This session will provide an in-depth review of procedures for online submission of the HEADS Data Survey for degree-granting institutions. A section-by-section overview of the Survey will explain in detail the Survey submission process, types of data collected, and suggested collection mechanisms. Questions will be taken at the end of the presentation. (Please note: “HEADS Part I” will not be repeated. “HEADS Part II: Using Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projections” will be offered Monday, 4:45 p.m.–6:00 p.m.)

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Briefing for NASM Evaluators

This annual briefing is offered by invitation for individuals currently trained and serving as NASM visiting evaluators. It provides an opportunity for evaluators to refresh their knowledge of NASM procedures, protocols, and standards, with particular focus on the Procedures and the Handbook. Helpful reminders regarding the format, preparation, and required content of Visitors’ Reports will be provided. The potential impact of the activities of external constituencies, such as the federal government, states, and other review bodies, which may affect the accreditation process, will be discussed. Documentation required of institutions and evaluators will be highlighted, as well as sources and uses of helpful and informative publications aimed to assist institutions in the preparation of Self-Studies and evaluators in the preparation of Visitors’ Reports. (Please note: Individuals interested in becoming NASM evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.)

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Dialogue Sessions

NASM hosts several dialogue sessions that provide opportunities for attendees to meet with Commission Chairs and members of the Committee on Ethics. These sessions are intended to offer opportunities for open and informative discussion. Although the Commission Chairs and Committee members will be unable to comment on accreditation actions or issues specific to a particular institution, they will address questions about accreditation policy and procedures, and accept suggestions with regard to NASM standards and accreditation procedures.

(Dialogue sessions with the Chair of the Commission on Accreditation and the Chair of the Commission on Community College Accreditation will be repeated Monday, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. The dialogue session with the Committee on Ethics will not be repeated.)

Commission on Accreditation                                                                         

Commission on Community College Accreditation                                

Committee on Ethics

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Hearing: Specific Operational Standards for Free-Standing Music Institutions of Higher Education; Specific Operational Standards for Proprietary Institutions of Higher Education
(Repeated Monday, 4:45 p.m.–6:00 p.m.)

2019 will mark the last year of the Association’s multiyear comprehensive review of its accreditation standards. This year’s hearing will take comments on two remaining sections of the Handbook which address accreditation standards: Specific Operational Standards for Free-Standing Music Institutions of Higher Education, and Specific Operational Standards for Proprietary Institutions of Higher Education. An electronic copy of the hearing text will be sent to all Annual Meeting attendees in advance of the meeting. Participants are encouraged to bring a marked copy to the hearing.

Please note: NASM welcomes comment pertaining to its accreditation standards. Feedback may be forwarded to the National Office at any time.

 

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Informal Gathering of New Music Executives

Individuals attending the NASM Annual Meeting for the first time, and those in the early years of their administrative careers, are encouraged to join other new executives for an informal gathering. This gathering provides an opportunity to meet, greet, cultivate valuable professional relationships and to initiate conversations with other new music executives.

6:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Reception for the Association

Monday, November 25, 2019

7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:15 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Coffee and Rolls for the Association

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Dialogue Sessions
(Repeat of Sunday, 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.)

Commission on Accreditation

Commission on Community College Accreditation

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Briefing: Federal Issues

Under the law, the federal government does not control higher education. However, the federal government does play a major role in developing conditions for the work of higher education, primarily through laws and regulations defining conditions for institutional participation in grant and student loan programs, and tax policies that influence economic conditions affecting education and the arts. Following a brief introduction to the higher education and policy landscapes, this session will address the current political climate; various pressures on institutions; and current and prospective federal policies, laws, and regulations affecting higher education and the arts. This briefing will take a non-partisan policy analysis approach, looking at the ramifications and costs of various options and probabilities. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Briefing: Local Problem-Solving with NASM Resources

Although NASM’s primary focus is accreditation, it also generates a wealth of resources applicable to non-accreditation-related issues. This session will provide an introduction to some of NASM’s most frequently cited papers and advisory statements on topics including justification, curricular review, promotion and tenure, musician health, and others. A brief look at the NASM website, including the location of various online resources, will be included. Music executives new to NASM, or those unfamiliar with its online resources and publications, are encouraged to attend.

9:15 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Second General Session

Report of the Executive Director
Election of Officers

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Keynote Address to the Association

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Demystifying Advocacy: Taking a Fresh Look at a Long-Standing Practice

Advocacy, simply defined, is an activity undertaken that aims to influence decision-making. The benefits of a well-conceived and executed advocacy plan are inestimable. On the other hand, the vacuum created by silence can render even the most accomplished program a best-kept secret, a hidden jewel that rarely benefits from the polish provided by local efforts to expand awareness, broaden exposure, and enhance support.

Advocacy campaigns come in various shapes and sizes; they can be delivered in various ways and with varying levels of intensity. The anticipation of designing an initiative given self-imposed pressures to include every conceivable facet, can be overwhelming. When this happens, we find ourselves in uncharted territories that employ approaches and make use of vernaculars that are not second nature—so we pause, or postpone, or stop altogether.

How then might music administrators avoid the pitfalls inherent in using advocacy as a technique rather than as a pathway to develop effective conversations—conversations that speak clearly and cogently to the indisputable and indispensable value of music study—with students, the institution, and the community? How then might music administrators employ advocacy techniques to announce, describe, promote, and seek support for music unit initiatives and efforts? A first and necessary step is to ensure that advocacy initiatives are undertaken on our own terms—terms that firmly align the value proposition with the pursuit of knowledge, skills, expertise, and approaches that develop in every music student the ability to think critically and reason intellectually; terms that articulate the ways in which such results are critical to an institution’s ongoing success. The second step is to ensure that the music program is a campus leader, an indispensable part of the productive life of the community, and that its work and contributions remain relevant.

Today’s session will provide to attendees an opportunity to imagine approaches that are grounded in the terms of music, and as well, to formulate together answers to ubiquitous questions which are posed with predictable frequency regarding music study, such as: Why is music study worth our time and investment? Are music majors employable—in music, in other areas? What other areas? Why? How are students assessed? What makes this assessment valuable? How do music schools know they are doing a good job? How is quality defined in music, in student achievement? How do music and music study contribute to the greater good?

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Title IX: Yesterday, Today, and What May Lie Ahead

Title IX, first introduced in 1972 as an amendment to the Higher Education Act, states that “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial aid.” In September of 2017, the Department of Education 1) rolled back Title IX guidance, specifically provisions included in the 2011 “Dear Colleague” letter and the 2014 Question and Answer set, 2) issued interim guidance pertaining to Title IX, and 3) published notice of its intent to renegotiate current regulations through the process known as Negotiated Rulemaking. It is safe to say that these activities have resulted in uncertainty as well as the absence of definitive information and guidance sorely needed by music executives and their institutions as they face and address issues unfolding on campus. This session will provide an overview of the law and current regulations, frame the anticipated outcome of the ongoing renegotiation process, and offer helpful interpretation of the interim guidance currently in force. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Aging Facilities: Challenges Posed; Opportunities Presented

A reality often faced today by music administrators is that facilities, although built or retrofitted to suit the needs of the music program at a particular point in time, can become wanting in their ability to support current music program activities. This is due in part to a number of conditions—ever-changing student needs, ever-expanding programmatic opportunities and curricular offerings, and ever more critical safety concerns. Yesterday’s buildings are hard-pressed to meet today’s demands. Left unchecked and lacking a systematic plan to address facilities needs, obsolescence can set in quickly, which can directly and negatively affect the ability of the music program to not only conduct its activities, but to carry out its mission.

This simple fact is that aging facilities give rise to a multitude of challenges that must be addressed in ongoing and deliberate fashions, paramount among them include issues related to health (i.e., noise levels, sound bleed, mold/mildew, etc.); safety measures (i.e., natural disasters, terrorism and active shooter events, etc.); and relevance (i.e., effectiveness of the space, adequacy of technology, ADA requirements, etc.).

Panelists will explore not only the issues faced, but offer insights and creative ways to enhance existing facilities so that they may be used to their best advantage. Time for questions and discussion will be offered.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Promoting and Supporting Comprehensive Student Wellness

Over the course of the past several years, Annual Meeting attendees have come together to consider and deepen their understanding of the important health and wellness issues that students enrolled in collegiate music programs face today. Previous sessions have served to frame the issues, offer suggestions pertaining to broad and general approaches to student wellness, and outline the nature of psychological challenges in play. During today’s session, attendees will continue the conversation by considering student trends that are advancing at an alarming rate given the pressures students face and the residual effects these pressures have on the physical, mental, social, and financial well-being of students. Discussion will include attention to and consideration of topics such as nutrition, personal finance, the potential effects associated with the use of social media platforms, engaging with professional colleagues, depression, suicide prevention, assisting students to identify struggling peers, as well as warning signs which may indicate the necessity to engage professional expertise.

Presenters will discuss the value of approaching the wellness of the “whole” student by way of making available an assortment of helpful and concurrent initiatives such as seminars, presentations, organized activities, and directed opportunities which together are intended to comprehensively address aspects of physical, mental, personal and social, and financial wellness.

Although there is no intention to suggest that music administrators become subject matter experts in these areas, it remains critical for administrators and faculty alike to be prepared to assist students as they face the ever-mounting pressures and challenges of everyday life. Following the presentation of salient information, time for questions and discussion will be provided.

12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Executive Committee members only)

12:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Specific Procedures for NASM Evaluation

This session will provide information and guidance concerning the self-study and visitation processes for individuals whose institutions are (1) scheduled to be visited in the next two years, (2) planning to begin the NASM evaluation process, (3) formally engaged in the process, or (4) contemplating the submission of original applications for accreditation. A step-by-step walk-through of the nuts-and-bolts of the accreditation process will be provided, including confirmation of timelines and deadlines, and information regarding accreditation procedures, Self-Study formats, on-site reviews, the Visitors’ Report, the Optional Response, and Commission action. All three Self-Study formats (A, B, and C) will be discussed. Participants are encouraged to bring either a hard or downloaded electronic copy of the current NASM Handbook and come prepared to ask questions. All interested individuals are welcome.

1:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Programs Sponsored by Regions (Regions 2, 4, 6, and 8)

3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Programs Sponsored by Regions (Regions 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9)

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Hearing: Specific Operational Standards for Free-Standing Music Institutions of Higher Education; Specific Operational Standards for Proprietary Institutions of Higher Education
(Repeat of Sunday, 4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.)

2019 will mark the last year of the Association’s multiyear comprehensive review of its accreditation standards. This year’s hearing will take comments on two remaining sections of the Handbook which address accreditation standards: Specific Operational Standards for Free-Standing Music Institutions of Higher Education, and Specific Operational Standards for Proprietary Institutions of Higher Education. An electronic copy of the hearing text will be sent to all Annual Meeting attendees in advance of the meeting. Participants are encouraged to bring a marked copy to the hearing.

Please note: NASM welcomes comment pertaining to its accreditation standards. Feedback may be forwarded to the National Office at any time.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Designing an Undergraduate Degree

From time to time, and for a variety of reasons, music units may decide to undertake the complex task of designing new undergraduate degree programs. There are many issues that must be considered, such as the existing mission of the institution and music unit, how the degree will dovetail with and support these missions, the students to be served, the coursework necessary to develop desired competencies, and the availability of applicable faculty expertise. As well, resources must be considered, and consensus must be built. Only with these understandings in hand can the architecture of a degree begin to take shape.

This session will focus on the structure of undergraduate degree programs. Differences between liberal arts and professional baccalaureate degrees will be addressed, as will structural differences between majors, minors, and areas of emphasis. Issues that arise regarding title and content consistency will be discussed. As well, the effective use of the standards to promote and embrace creative and innovative curricular programming will be explored.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

HEADS Part II: Using Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projections

The institutional research data gathered and compiled by the Higher Education Arts Data Services project constitute a unique and valuable resource for music executives at degree-granting institutions. This session will highlight many of the ways the data can be used to assist, support, and possibly guide local planning, conversations, and decision-making. The session will offer a detailed overview of statistics contained in the HEADS Data Summaries (the aggregate reports compiled annually from HEADS Data Surveys), and the use of HEADS Data Summaries and Special Reports for comparison among specific peer institutions. In addition, attendees will also learn how to create longitudinal reports, and consider together how such reports can be used to capture, analyze, and present available data in ways which may convincingly support music unit initiatives.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Historically Black Institutions

This session is designed to provide a forum where ideas and concerns of particular relevance to historically black institutions may be discussed. Attendance is open to 
all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Roundtable for Small Music Units

Music executives from small music units, typically with fewer than 50 majors, will have the opportunity to discuss topics of specific relevance or concern, and to pose questions
 to colleagues facing similar challenges and opportunities. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Issues in Sacred Music/Worship Studies

This open forum will provide an opportunity to discuss 
topics of interest and importance to units offering sacred music/worship studies. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics in advance.

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Roundtable for Community and Two-Year Colleges

This interactive session will provide an opportunity to brainstorm and discuss ideas and best practices of particular relevance to community and two-year colleges. Participants will be encouraged to share information from their own institutions, followed by a time for reflection and discussion. Attendance is open to all interested individuals.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Board of Directors Breakfast Seminar Meeting
(Board of Directors members only)

9:30 a.m.

Adjournment

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